A research study interviewing affected individuals and their families in New South Wales

This research study will interview people living with HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C in New South Wales, as well as family members, and then stakeholders in the health and social care sectors.

As the management of blood borne viruses undergoes rapid change, the families of those affected by HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are also living through and responding to those changes. Yet both research and policy responses remain largely focused on the individual, with less known about the role and experiences of families in the prevention, management and treatment of these infections in our community. The forms and meanings of ‘family’ also continue to undergo considerable social transformation.

Therefore, the broad aims of the research are:

  • To describe the experiences of Australian families affected by HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C
  • To understand how differences in family forms and contexts intersect with understandings of and approaches to the prevention, management and treatment of these infections in everyday family life
  • To build a theory of serodiscordance (i.e. mixed infection status) which is informed by the lived experiences of affected families and extends beyond a biomedical focus on individual health and risk

Please visit the relevant sections of this website, or contact the research team, for more information.

Contact us

To find out more, please contact us on:
c.newman@unsw.edu.au
0457 241 386
 
Or to indicate your interest in taking part, complete the following confidential form:

I am volunteering to tell my story about what family has meant to me as a person with HIV, hepatitis B and/or hepatitis CI am volunteering to tell my story as the family member of someone with HIV, hepatitis B and/or hepatitis C